Saturday, June 1, 2019

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA)


What is CLA?
Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) refers to a group of naturally occurring isomers of linoleic acid present in ruminant fats and dairy products. Unlike industrial trans fatty acids, trans CLA may be of great potential benefit to human health.
CLA isomers are produced from the bio hydrogenation of linoleic acid by rumen bacteria of animals. The isomers that contain a double bond in the trans configuration are biologically active.1 CLA has been shown to offer numerous health benefits with respect to cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity, osteoporosis and the immune system.

The Effects of CLA on Health

For the past two decades, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has attracted significant research interest due to its favourable potential effects on health. While studies are still in their early phase, published reviews on CLA have highlighted the benefits of this natural ruminant fat.
Various animal and human studies have investigated the role of CLA on health. CLA may play an important protective role in:
·         Cardiovascular diseases,
·         Cancer,
·         Obesity,
·         Bone health,
·         Immune and inflammatory responses.

Cardiovascular Disease

Emerging evidence suggests that ruminant trans fat is beneficial for cardiovascular health. Results from a number of animal studies indicate that CLA has anti-atherosclerotic properties. It has been found that CLA improves blood lipid profiles by reducing total cholesterol, triacylglyceride and LDL cholesterol levels and improving HDL cholesterol levels. However, human studies on CLA and cardiovascular disease markers such as blood lipids and blood pressure have revealed inconsistent findings.

Cancer

Evidence from the literature suggests that CLA has potential benefits against cancer. Studies examining the consumption of CLA-rich milk products such as cheese have shown an inverse association with breast cancer. One study also found an inverse correlation between CLA intake and colorectal cancer among women. Animal models suggest that the mechanisms of the anti-carcinogenic properties of CLA include modulation of eicosanoid production, interference in cell signaling pathways, inhibition of DNA synthesis, promotion of apoptosis, and modulation of angiogenesis.

Obesity

Several studies of CLA supplementation have demonstrated that CLA may have an anti-obesity effect and may improve body composition. In a review article on long-term CLA supplementation in humans, CLA was linked to a modest reduction in body fat and/or the prevention of regaining body fat in overweight or obese subjects.Another review examined the mechanistic actions of CLA in obesity, and it was found in some studies on humans that supplementation with CLA reduced adiposity, whereas this effect has been found consistently in all studies on animals. The consistency in the results of animal studies may be due to the higher CLA dosage used in the trials with animal models compared to the dosage used on human subjects.
The potential anti-obesity mechanisms of CLA include appetite suppression and increased energy expenditure through increased basal metabolic rate. Additionally, CLA inhibits adipogenesis and regulates lipogenesis. Another anti-obesity mechanism of CLA is that it induces inflammation to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines called adipokines. These can cause insulin resistance, which in turn suppresses lipid synthesis and increases lipolysis in adipocytes. Furthermore, CLA promotes and regulates adipocyte apoptosis.3

Immune and Inflammatory Response

Various studies using animal models have shown beneficial effects of CLA on immune and inflammatory responses, including:
·         reduction of adverse effects caused by immune challenges;
·         reduction of colonic inflammation;
·         decrease in antigen-induced cytokine production in immune-competent cells;
·         reduction of allergic-type immune responses;
·         Modulation of the production of cytokines, prostaglandins and leukotrienes
.

Conclusion

There is consistent evidence from animal studies that CLA may have several beneficial effects on health




Disclaimer: Any product recommendation is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Our statements and information have not necessarily been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

We expressly disclaim responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application or interpretation of any material provided to you as the client. Please treat this for Educational and Informational Purposes Only.

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Difference Between Peanut Butter and Normal Butter


Peanut butter and butter are food spreads that have been in used for years. Well, both peanut butter and butter comes with many differences in their contents, nutritional value and other aspects.

A dairy product, butter is made from milk. Churning fresh/fermented cream or milk produces butter. It comprises of butterfat, milk proteins and water. Butter is normally produced from the milk of cow. But butter is also made from milk of other mammals like goats, sheep, buffalo and yaks.

On the other hand, Peanut butter is made from roasted ground peanuts. Dextrose or other sweeteners, hydrogenated vegetable oil and salt are the main ingredients in peanut butter. Dextrose and other sweeteners give taste, hydrogenated vegetable stabilizes and prevents separation of oils, and salt prevents spoilage.

Peanut butter comes in smooth and crunchy forms. On the other hand, butter remains solid when refrigerated but spreads at room temperature and melts at 32 to 35 degree Celsius.

When comparing the nutritional values, peanut butter and butter have much difference between them. When comparing the nutritional value per 100 gm of peanut butter and butter, one can see that butter comes with more energy than peanut butter. When butter comes with energy of 720 kcal, it is just 590 kcal in peanut butter.

Butter comes with a higher fat content when compared to peanut butter. When 81 gm of fat is seen in a 100 gm of butter, it is only 50 gm in peanut butter. Comparing the protein level, butter comes with just one gm of protein while peanut butter has 25 gm of protein content.

Health Benefits of Peanut Butter -

Eating peanut butter in moderation and as part of an overall healthful diet may provide the following benefits:

1. Weight loss
Several studies suggest that eating peanuts and other nuts can help people maintain their weight, or even help with weight loss.

This may be because peanuts improve satiety, which is the feeling of fullness, thanks to their protein, fat, and fiber content.

A 2018 study suggests that eating nuts, including peanuts, reduces a person's risk of being overweight or obese. This study compared the dietary and lifestyle data for over 373,000 people from 10 European countries over 5 years.

Earlier research based on data gathered from over 51,000 women suggested that those who ate nuts twice weekly or more experienced slightly less weight gain over an 8-year period than women who rarely ate nuts.

2. Boosting heart health
Peanut butter contains many nutrients that can improve heart health, including:

monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)
polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs)
niacin
magnesium
vitamin E
The proportion of unsaturated fats (PUFAs and MUFAs) to saturated fats in the diet plays a particularly important role in heart health. Peanut butter has a similar ratio to olive oil — which is also known as a heart-healthy option.

A high intake of nuts may have links to a reduced risk of mortality from heart disease or other causes. The researchers recommend peanuts in particular as a cost-effective way to improve heart health for some people.

Research also suggests that including 46 g per day of peanuts or peanut butter into an American Diabetes Association (ADA) diet plan for 6 months could benefit the heart, improve blood lipid profiles, and control weight for people with diabetes.

However, as peanut butter is high in calories, it is crucial that a person limits their intake if they do not want to put on weight. Eating more than the recommended amount will also increase fat and sodium intake, which does not benefit the heart.

3. Bodybuilding
Senior lady working out at the gym
Peanut butter is an easy way to increase calorie intake.
Many bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts include peanut butter in their diets for various reasons.

Although calorie amounts will vary based on stature, activity level, and metabolic rate, the typical daily recommended calorie intake ranges from around 1,600–2,400 calories per day for women and up to 3,000 calories per day for men. However, active adult men should consume up to 3,000 calories daily, while active women need up 2,400 calories per day.

Thanks to its high-calorie content, peanut butter is an easy way to increase calorie and unsaturated fat intake.

Nut butter is also a source of protein, which is essential for building and repairing muscles. Although peanut butter is not a complete protein — meaning it does not contain all of the essential amino acids the body needs — it does count toward a person's daily protein intake.

Spreading peanut butter on whole-grain bread makes a more complete protein meal, as the bread contains the amino acid methionine, which peanut butter lacks.

4. Managing blood sugar levels
Peanut butter is a relatively low-carbohydrate food that contains good amounts of fats and protein, as well as some fiber.

These characteristics mean that peanut butter, with no added sugar, does not have a significant impact on blood glucose levels. This means it can be a good option for those with diabetes.

The ADA recommend that people replace saturated fats with monounsaturated fats in their diets. They suggest peanut butter, peanuts, and peanut oil as good sources of monounsaturated fat.

A small 2013 study suggests that eating peanut butter or peanuts for breakfast could help women with obesity and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes to manage their blood glucose levels. According to the survey, the women who added nuts to their breakfast had lower blood sugar levels and reported less hunger compared to women who ate a breakfast that contained the same amount of carbohydrates but no nuts.

Peanut butter is a good source of magnesium, which is an essential nutrient for people with diabetes. Continuous periods of high blood sugar may reduce magnesium levels in the body. Low magnesium levels are linked to prediabetes and type 2 diabetes.

5. Reducing the risk of breast disease
Eating peanut butter, especially from a young age, may reduce the risk of benign breast disease (BBD), which increases the risk of breast cancer.

A study in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, reports that eating peanut butter and nuts at any age may result in a lower risk of developing BDD by age 30.

The researchers examined the data for over 9,000 schoolgirls in America. Other types of pulses, such as beans and soy, along with vegetable fats and other nuts, may also offer protection from BBD.

Even those with a family history of breast cancer had a significantly lower risk if they ate peanut butter and these other foods.




Disclaimer: Any product recommendation is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Our statements and information have not necessarily been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.


We expressly disclaim responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application or interpretation of any material provided to you as the client. Please treat this for Educational and Informational Purposes Only. 

Thursday, April 11, 2019

Benefit of Carb Loading For Athletes/Runners


As a runner, you know the importance of glycogen stores (reservoir of glucose) that are vital to support the performance levels. Carbohydrate loading refers to a strategy that involves consuming higher than usual amount of carbohydrates, 1-4 days prior to the event to maximise glycogen stores. This can help fuel the run and prevent you from hitting the wall. Muscle glycogen levels are normally in the range of 100-120 mmol/kg ww (wet weight). With carb-loading (up to 70% of your daily calories), your glycogen levels can increase to around 150-200 mmol/kg ww.

Check out this simple guide on carbohydrate loading




Carbohydrate loading can extend the duration of exercise by approximately 20% and improve performance over a set distance by 2-3%.


Three tips on effective carb loading:

Fuel it enough



Increase your carbohydrate intake to about 10-12 g/kg of body weight (70% of your daily calories), 3-4 days before the event. The easiest way to achieve a simple, successful carb load is to include carbohydrate-rich foods at every meal and snack. Some examples are given in the table below.6

Watch for other macros
Avoid foods high in fat such as fried foods and limit high protein foods such as meat just before the event, as they will fill you up making it difficult to consume enough carbohydrates. Opt for low fibre foods, as too much fibre may cause stomach upset.
Relax and Rest completely the day before your big event. Eating enough carbohydrates in combination with tapering activity helps improve glycogen stores.
Still not sure on what to eat? Have a look at this simple meal plan that would be helpful for you.
The following meal plan can be used as a reference for a 70kg athlete targeting at carbohydrate loading:
References
  1. Coaching Association of Canada. Carbohydrate loading - Is it for you? ON, Canada: Sports Nutrition Advisory Committee; 2011.
  2. Australian Sport Commission. Carbohydrate loading. Bruce, Australia: AIS Sports Nutrition; 2009.
  3. Mc Kune A. Carbohydrate loading and exercise performance. Washington, DC, USA: Spring; 2007
  4. Synder CV. Carbohydrate loading: What’s an athlete to do? Ohio, USA: Cleveland clinic; 2011
  5. Wheat foods Council. Healthy carb-loading maximises energy for the big race. CO, USA: Wheat foods council; 2015.
  6. Gopalan C, Rama Sastri BV, Balasubramanian SC. Nutritive value of Indian foods. Hyderabad: National Institute of Nutrition, ICMR. 2012; 47-58.




Disclaimer: Any product recommendation is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Our statements and information have not necessarily been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.


We expressly disclaim responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application or interpretation of any material provided to you as the client. Please treat this for Educational and Informational Purposes Only. 










Wednesday, November 7, 2018

The Importance of Vitamins in Our Body

Vitamins are a group of substances that are needed for normal cell function, growth, and development.

There are 13 essential vitamins. This means that these vitamins are required for the body to work properly. They are:


Vitamin A,C, D , E, K,B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), Pantothenic acid (B5), Biotin (B7),Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), Foliate (folic acid and B9).

Each of the vitamins listed below has an important job in the body. A vitamin deficiency occurs when you do not get enough of a certain vitamin. Vitamin deficiency can cause health problems.

Not eating enough fruits, vegetables, beans, lentils, whole grains and fortified dairy foods may increase your risk for health problems, including heart disease, cancer, and poor bone health (osteoporosis).
·         Vitamin A helps form and maintains healthy teeth, bones, soft tissue, mucus membranes, and skin.
·         Vitamin B6 is also called pyridoxine. Vitamin B6 helps form red blood cells and maintain brain function. This vitamin also plays an important role in the proteins that are part of many chemical reactions in the body. The more protein you eat the more pyridoxine your body requires.
·         Vitamin B12, like the other B vitamins, is important for metabolism. It also helps form red blood cells and maintain the central nervous system.
·         Vitamin C, also called ascorbic acid, is an antioxidant that promotes healthy teeth and gums. It helps the body absorb iron and maintain healthy tissue. It also promotes wound healing.
·         Vitamin D is also known as the "sunshine vitamin," since it is made by the body after being in the sun. Ten to 15 minutes of sunshine 3 times a week is enough to produce the body's requirement of vitamin D for most people at most latitudes. People who do not live in sunny places may not make enough vitamin D. It is very hard to get enough vitamin D from food sources alone. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium. You need calcium for the normal development and maintenance of healthy teeth and bones. It also helps maintain proper blood levels of calcium and phosphorus.
·         Vitamin E is an antioxidant also known as tocopherol. It helps the body form red blood cells and use vitamin K.
·         Vitamin K is needed because without it, blood would not stick together (coagulate). Some studies suggest that it is important for bone health.
·         Biotin is essential for the metabolism of proteins and carbohydrates, and in the production of hormones and cholesterol.
·         Niacin is a B vitamin that helps maintain healthy skin and nerves. It also has cholesterol-lowering effects at higher doses.
·         Folate works with vitamin B12 to help form red blood cells. It is needed for the production of DNA, which controls tissue growth and cell function. Any woman who is pregnant should be sure to get enough folate. Low levels of folate are linked to birth defects such as spina bifida. Many foods are now fortified with folic acid.
·         Pantothenic acid is essential for the metabolism of food. It also plays a role in the production of hormones and cholesterol.
·         Riboflavin (vitamin B2) works with the other B vitamins. It is important for body growth and the production of red blood cells.
·         Thiamine (vitamin B1) helps the body cells change carbohydrates into energy. Getting enough carbohydrates is very important during pregnancy and breastfeeding. It is also essential for heart function and healthy nerve cells.





                                               Food Sources
 FAT-SOLUBLE VITAMINS
Vitamin A:-   Dark-colored fruits, Dark leafy vegetables, Egg yolk, Fortified milk and dairy products (cheese, yogurt, butter, and cream), Liver, beef, and fish.
Vitamin D:-  Fish (fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, herring, and orange roughy), Fish liver oils (cod liver oil), Fortified cereals, Fortified milk and dairy products (cheese, yogurt, butter, and cream).
Vitamin E:- Avocado, Dark green vegetables (spinach, broccoli, asparagus, and turnip greens), Margarine (made from safflower, corn, and sunflower oil), Oils (safflower, corn, and sunflower), Papaya and mango, Seeds and nuts, Wheat germ and wheat germ oil.
Vitamin K:- Cabbage, Cauliflower, Cereals, Dark green vegetables (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and asparagus), Dark leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, collards, and turnip greens), Fish, liver, beef, and eggs.
  WATER-SOLUBLE VITAMINS
Biotin:-  Chocolate, Cereal, Egg yolk, Legumes, Milk, Nuts, Organ meats (liver, kidney), Pork, Yeast.
Folate:- Asparagus and broccoli, Beets, Brewer's yeast, Dried beans (cooked pinto, navy, kidney, and lima), Fortified cereals, Green, leafy vegetables (spinach and romaine lettuce), Lentils, Oranges and orange juice, Peanut butter, Wheat germ.
Niacin (vitamin B3):- Avocado, Eggs, Enriched breads and fortified cereals, Fish (tuna and salt-water fish), Lean meats, Legumes, Nuts, Potato, Poultry.
Pantothenic acid:- Avocado, Broccoli, kale, and other vegetables in the cabbage family, Eggs, Legumes and lentils, Milk, Mushroom, Organ meats, Poultry, White and sweet potatoes, Whole-grain cereal.
Thiamine (vitamin B1):- Dried milk, Egg, Enriched bread and flour, Lean meats, Legumes (dried beans), Nuts and seeds, Organ meats, Peas,Whole grains.
Pyroxidine (vitamin B6):- Avocado, Banana, Legumes (dried beans), Meat, Nuts, Poultry, Whole grains (milling and processing removes a lot of this vitamin).
Vitamin B12:- Meat, Eggs, Fortified foods such as soymilk, Milk and milk products, Organ meats (liver and kidney), Poultry, Shellfish.                                                                                  
NOTE: Animal sources of vitamin B12 are absorbed much better by the body than plant sources
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid):- Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Citrus fruits, Potatoes, Spinach, Strawberries, Tomatoes and tomato juice.


Disclaimer: Any product recommendation is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Our statements and information have not necessarily been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

We expressly disclaim responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application or interpretation of any material provided to you as the client. Please treat this for Educational and Informational Purposes Only. 

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Citrulline Malate


What Is Citrulline Malate?
Citrulline is an amino acid that is produced when the amino acid ornithine combines with carbamoyl phosphate. This happens during the urea cycle, a way that the body disposes of nitrogen waste. The excess citrulline from supplementation is thought to put the urea cycle into overdrive, sucking up the ammonia (made of three nitrogen molecules) produced by working muscles before it can produce fatigue.

Citrulline is also a by-product of the body's conversion of the amino acid arginine into nitric oxide (NO). Excess citrulline, a number of studies have shown, increases the amount of arginine in the blood, leading to increased NO production. More NO, you may have heard, means increased blood flow to muscles during exercise, which allows them to last longer under duress—and produce bigger muscle pumps to weightlifters.

L-citrulline is a naturally occurring amino acid found in food, such as watermelons, and     also made in the body. Our bodies change L-citrulline into another amino acid called L-arginine and also to nitric oxide. L-citrulline might help increase the supply of ingredients the body needs to making certain proteins.

SOURCES- watermelons,legumes,meat,fish,nuts, or can be purchased as a supplement


 Benefits of L-Citrulline
The benefit of greater amounts of NO would then mean improved blood flow which could increase nutrient delivery and waste product clearance from working muscles (e.g. plasma lactate and ammonium).
This would therefore improve muscle function and capacity to sustain activity; and subsequently reduce fatigue.

 Malate | How does it work?
So that explains how citrulline assists our ability to beat fatigue; but what about the other bit which is attached?
Malate facilitates a process called anaplerosis which is the act of replenishing component parts of the tricarboxyic acid cycle- also known as the Kreb cycle. This is a key component of aerobic respiration and how we gain energy from the use of oxygen.
Malate will influence certain anaplerotic reactions and reduce the block of the oxidative energy pathway caused by excess ammonia. It then uses lactic acid formed as a byproduct of exercise to form more pyruvate. With more efficiency of aerobic metabolism, we are then able to create more adenosine triphosphate (ATP- energy!)- Hence reducing fatigue!
In fact, upon testing, significantly more aerobically produced ATP is generated when CM is provided, showing an enhancement of oxidative processes. This study also showed significantly faster phosphocreatine level recovery following exercise and levels of both muscle PH and power were both sustained at a higher level- indicating a decreased rate of ATP formed through anaerobic metabolism.

Other plasma and muscle changes following exercise with CM supplementation include higher levels of insulin; more efficient use of branch chain amino acids during exercise; and facilitation of greater increases of growth hormone.






Disclaimer: Any product recommendation is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Our statements and information have not necessarily been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
We expressly disclaim responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application or interpretation of any material provided to you as the client. Please treat this for Educational and Informational Purposes Only. 

Saturday, May 12, 2018

Muscle Builders VS Mass Gainers

All you need to know about Gainers!!
            
 What Is A Mass Gainer?
A mass gainer is a supplement that provides protein, carbohydrates and possibly fats
With the intention of helping to add muscle mass. It is a high-calorie protein powder.
The more calorie intake more will be the gain. These mass gainers generally comes with proteins
and carbs in the  ratio of 1:4 or 1:5.These products has much more calories that helps in increasing
Muscle mass, muscle girth and restore extra carbs in the forms of glycogen. Although  prolong
Use of mass gainer might give person a bulky appearance, hence proper supplementation & expert guidance is needed in order to build proper aesthetics physique. To put on mass you need to be in a calorie surplus. This means you are consuming 300-500 calories more per day than you’re burning through exercise and just going through your daily routine.
If you have been trying to add mass and you’ve seen no increase in weight then you’re not in a calorie surplus. Without being in a surplus you’re not going to gain mass. It really is that simple. When trying to reach a calorie surplus it is important to consume the right quality of macronutrients. You may well have heard the phrase ‘dirty bulk’, which refers to eating whatever you want to achieve a calorie surplus. Consuming fried chicken may increase your calorie intake but it also comes with increased fat.

Let me put more light on; what is muscle builder?
These are one of the category of supplements that has proteins to carbs ratio of 1:2 or
1:3.generally delivers 350 calories per serving. Gym enthusiasts looking to build muscle
 and gain mass might choose muscle builder supplements. The combination of proteins may help
 give you a slight muscle-building edge and the extra calories can encourage anabolism & muscle
 growth.  Supplement manufacturers may also claim that their products help you recover faster and
burn fat. Unless you are undergoing a strict strength-training regimen, muscle builder supplements
 are probably unnecessary.

About the Author – Ravi A Yadav is a registered* pharmacist and a gym enthusiast. He is an expert in weight management and fat loss guidance. He has conducted various fitness workshops in well known institutions & gyms. * Registration Number :210683


Link:- www.thehapstore.com



Disclaimer: Any product recommendation is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Our statements and information have not necessarily been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
We expressly disclaim responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application or interpretation of any material provided to you as the client. Please treat this for Educational and Informational Purposes Only. 

PRE-WORKOUT NUTRITION

When it comes to workout nutrition , it becomes quite confusing what should be taken pre-workout such that before workout so as to maintain the optimum energy level throughout the workout process .the choice of protein and carbohydrates and their quantity required in the pre and post- workout meals are targeted to serve two purposes.
1)  It should provide enough fuel that can enhance muscle performance during workout process.
2)  The one that helps in faster recovery
 Energy   system of a human body
Why there is need of pre-workout nutrition?
Muscle contraction during weight training or cardiovascular training requires energy. Muscle contracts due to actin and myosin protein filaments comes closer by sliding over each .This sliding of the actin and myosin protein filaments in the muscle needs energy .If a optimum level of energy deriving sources such as  carbs  and  protein is not up to the mark there is process called catabolism takes place that leads to breakdown of muscle hence pre-workout nutrition has an important role in muscle building process.
BMR stands for basal metabolic rate is an important phenomena that contributes in fat loss process and this is directly proportional to the fat loss such that as a basal metabolic rate increases the fat loss will be more hence exercise training with higher calorie- burn involves only 1-2 hours of the day , where as our body burns calorie for our BMR continuously 24 hours of the day.
Main characteristics of pre-weight training nutrition
1)    Carbohydrates sources 
 The main purpose of carbohydrate intake is to  increase glucose storage as muscle glycogen .In order to achieve this goal the carbohydrate should be slowly absorbed such that there is slow release of glucose into the bloodstream and the insulin diverts all the glucose into muscle glycogen. Whole cereals – Wheat chapati, dalia , oates , cereals serve as better pre-workout  carbohydrates than fruits before intense weight training ,it supply higher quantity of carbohydrates and energy with lesser amount of fibre .
Slow –absorbed fruits includes Apple, Orange, pear, guava, papaya
Apple takes too long to digest as it contains fructose and high fibre. Pre –weight training carbohydrate should never be fast absorbed and high fibre- food.
2)   Protein  sources
 The main purpose of pre workout protein source is to prevent muscle breakdown for amino acids .During an intense workout, amino acids such as the Branched chain amino acids BCAA are rapidly used for energy .supplying a best quality protein of high biological value and rich in BCAA will reduce breakdown of muscle protein for obtaining the same amino acids.
Slow absorbed first-class protein rich in BCAA is the ideal pre-workout protein
Few example skimmed milk paneer or casein, combination of egg white and yolk may be included. The protein source should never be heavy to digest and second class protein such as pulses, soya , nuts and other plant protein. Recommended quantity may be 20-30 grams of first class protein.

About the Author – Ravi A Yadav is a registered* pharmacist and a gym enthusiast. He is an expert in weight management and fat loss guidance. He has conducted various fitness workshops in well known institutions & gyms. * Registration Number awaited.

Link:-www.thehapstore.com


Disclaimer: Any product recommendation is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Our statements and information have not necessarily been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
We expressly disclaim responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application or interpretation of any material provided to you as the client. Please treat this for Educational and Informational Purposes Only.